Fee Schedule

Fee Schedule

Ebert Home Inspection
WHAT IS A HOME INSPECTION?

A Home Inspection is an objective, neutral, unbiased visual examination of the structure and systems of a home, foundation.

WHAT DOES A HOME INSPECTION INCLUDE?

A standard home inspection summarizes findings from a visual examination of the home's heating system, central air conditioning system (conditions permitting), interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows, doors; the foundation, basement, and the visible structural elements of the home.

WHY DO I NEED A HOME INSPECTION?

A home inspection summarizes the conditions of the property, pointing out and highlighting the need for major repairs and also identifies areas in need of maintenance attention.

The largest single investment you will ever make will be the purchase of the home. You should learn as much about the condition of the property and the need for major repairs before buying. That way, the home of your dreams will not become a disappointing nightmare. Buyers and sellers depend upon an accurate, unbiased home inspection to maximize their knowledge of the property in order to make intelligent, informed decisions before completing the purchase of the home.

A home inspection points out the positive aspects of the home, as well as maintenance elements that will be necessary to preserve the value of the home.

Our home inspectors are house experts. Their expertise will help you minimize costly or unpleasant surprises after taking possession.

IF THE HOUSE PROVES TO BE IN GOOD CONDITION, DID I REALLY NEED THE HOME INSPECTION?

Certainly. Now you can complete the purchase of your home with confidence in the condition of the property and all of it's operating systems. Additionally, you will have learned many things about your new home that will allow you to maintain its value.

HOW LONG WILL THE HOME INSPECTION TAKE?

A general home inspection should take from two to three hours on a typical home. This time varies with the size and condition of the home. This includes the actual inspection and the summarizing for the purchaser. Anything drastically less will usually mean insufficient time has been spent. Townhomes and condominium apartments usually take less time.

HOW LONG HAS THE COMPANY BEEN IN THE BUSINESS OF PERFORMING HOME INSPECTIONS?

25 years.

DOES THE HOME INSPECTOR CARRY GENERAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR ACCIDENTS THAT HAPPEN DURING THE INSPECTION?  

Yes. General liability insurance protects everybody from an accident that happens at the inspection. Ebert home inspection carries general liability insurance in conjunction with it's errors & omissions insurance and workman's compensation insurance. 

WILL THE INSPECTOR OR HIS COMPANY REPAIR WHAT THEY FIND WRONG, OR WILL THEY RECOMMEND SOMEONE ELSE TO DO THE REPAIRS?

This is a major conflict of interest that should be avoided at all costs. A home inspector should never use the inspection as a means of generating income in another field. To do so would take away the neutrality necessary for an unbiased report, and would make the findings suspect. Licensed New Jersey Home Inspectors are prohibited from having such a conflict of interest.

WHAT KIND OF EDUCATION, WORK EXPERIENCE, AND HOME INSPECTION TRAINING DOES THE INSPECTOR HAVE THAT QUALIFIED HIM (HER) TO PERFORM HOME INSPECTIONS?

A minimum of 500 home inspections performed combined with several years of experience in the field.

WILL THE INSPECTOR PROVIDE A DETAILED, WRITTEN REPORT ON SIGHT AT THE INSPECTION?

Yes. The buyer, attorney and realtor will receive a full narrative report with photos, via email within 24 hours after the inspection is completed.

DOES THE HOME INSPECTOR ENCOURAGE HIS BEING FOLLOWED AND QUESTIONS BEING ASKED? IS THERE A FORMAL REVIEW AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE INSPECTION?

This is a valuable educational opportunity for you to learn about how things work around your house; the inspector may point out things that do not quite merit inclusion in the report, but are nonetheless things you should keep an eye on. Ebert Home Inspectors want their clients to be at the inspection, to be present throughout the entire inspection; and encourage them to join in the inspection and to ask questions.

This enables the inspector to verbally explain the significance of any item reported upon in an educational manner so as to not needlessly alarm clients about elements that are routine maintenance or minor repair issues. This also allows you to see the property through the inspector's eyes, and will allow you to better understand the written report. If an inspector does not encourage you to join in the inspection, consider this a "red-flag".

DOES THE INSPECTOR GIVE THE CLIENTS A DETAILED AND WRITTEN INSPECTION AGREEMENT TO READ AND SIGN PRIOR TO THE INSPECTION THAT TELLS THE CLIENT WHAT THE INSPECTION DOES AND DOES NOT INCLUDE, WHAT THE COST IS, AND SPELLS OUT IN DETAIL HOW ANY FUTURE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IS HANDLED?

Written Pre-Inspection agreements help everybody by outlining the rules up front- no surprises. A Pre-Inspection Agreement is required by the New Jersey Home Inspection Licensing Act; it is supposed to be mailed , faxed, or e-mailed to the client at least one day prior to the inspection. Ebert Home Inspection's Agreement is four pages and thoroughly details all of the above.

CAN A HOUSE FAIL A HOME INSPECTION?

No. There is no "pass", and there is no "fail". An Ebert Home inspection is an examination of the current condition of the property. It is not an appraisal; and it is not a municipal code inspection. The Ebert Home inspection will describe the physical condition of the home and describe what may require repair or replacement.

DO I NEED A HOME INSPECTION WHEN MY LENDING INSTITUTION IS HAVING THE HOUSE APPRAISED? 

Yes, an appraisal is an independent, third party evaluation of the current market value of the house. The primary purpose of an appraisal is to establish the value so the lending institution can determine how much it can loan to the buyer. An appraiser evaluates the home relative to similar properties in the vicinity and the prices at which they sold in order to establish the value of your house.
 
An Ebert Home Inspector conducts a thorough evaluation of the house's major systems and it's structural integrity. The appraiser is typically working for the lending institution. Ebert Home Inspection works for you! In fact, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires prospective home buyers to sign an advisory which advises them to obtain a home inspection in addition to the appraisal before purchasing a home using an FHA mortgage. The costs of the inspection and appraisal can also be included in an FHA mortgage.

WHEN IS PAYMENT DUE?

Payment is due at the conclusion of the inspection. We accept cash, personal checks, bank checks, or money orders and credit card payments.

WHAT IF THE REPORT REVEALS PROBLEMS?

There is no perfect house! When the inspector identifies problems, it does not indicate to you that you shouldn't purchase the home. The inspection findings serve to educate you in advance of the purchase of the property. The home inspection might allow you to adjust the purchase price of the home if the seller is flexible with the contract terms if major problem are found. If your budget is "tight", or if you do not want to be involved in future repair work, this information is extremely valuable to you.
Ebert Home Inspections
Toll Free: 800-969-3110
Phone: (973) 239-6880

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